Origin Of Clans In Ebiraland

Clans In Ebiraland: About 1680 AD, Ebira People (along with the Idoma and Igala) migrated out of Wukari, a chieftaincy dispute started, the Ebira later split into various groups and settled in different locations between 1680 and 1750 AD.

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The Concept of “Avọ Ẹri” in Ebira Language

Ebira LAnguage, Ebira Proverb Ebiraland.

There is an Ebira Proverb in Ebira Language that Says “Avọ ri Esi’hu vancha Ni“, this simply means that giving thanks for yesterday’s favor, will open way for more favors in future, in the next paragraph i will tell you the simple meaning of this Ebira Idiom. So let’s break this Ebira Proverb Down.

Avọ ri Esi’hu vancha Ni

Ebira Proverb
Ebira LanguageEnglish Language
AvọThanks
ẸriYesterday
EsiWhat they use
HuDrink
EvanchaPlethoric (Too Much)
Ebira Language Translated to English Language

In the olden days when drinking is part of our culture (Eche Omo and Eche Ayi), people often go back to where they got free drinks yesterday, to say thank you for the favor so that they can drink again and in excess – that is why they say Avo Eri Esi hu Evancha ni.

You see! Ebira People (Anebira) are very unique and Ohomorihi (God) has blessed the race with lots of attributes, on of the attributes appreciation for past favors or help received from others (Avọ Ẹri).

Are we still appreciative to others as Anebiras?
Genuine expressive appreciative gestures from you to other people times over, speak volume of the kind of person you are and whether it is worth it to help you or to help you again!

Another Ebira Saying:

Ozi-Oweyi Oku Avo Eri Ver’osa Doni

When a child say thank you for past favor! he will surely get another . Ebiraland.com.

Thanks for reading please share below and drop your comments. Ebiraland.com

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Sexuality, Family Values, and Gender Roles Among Ebira People.

Sexuality among Anebiras determines to a large extent the kind of roles that men or women play at home, social gatherings, choice of vocation until recently when barriers seem to be giving way to equality in every aspect of life.

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Useful Phrases in Ebira Language With English Translation

A collection of useful Phrases in Ebira Language compiled by Yakubu Binuyaminu Adeiza. If you can provide recordings of this phraces please feel free to contact me on whatsapp with this number +2347033004080

Phrases In Ebira Language

Also Read: Basic Greetings In Ebira Language

Ebira LanguageEnglish Language
Etemeya? How are you?
Ma Yin Oisi Awu I love you
NgwaoHello
TaoHi
Avu dahi?Hope you are fine?
Onyi Awu yo?What about your mother?
Ada awu yo? What about your father?
Anyari Ekuhi EtaLong time no see
Ireha awu ri?What is your name?
Ma dahiI am fine
Ekura amiMy town
Irenu AmiMy Mouth
Onyi AmiMy Mother
Ma ku Ohomorihi AvoI thank God
EeYes
HeiyeNo
Ve VarisaCome and Eat
EiyaraMaybe
MeiyeI don’t know
ArihiniPlease
Oya Osoni vi?How much is this?
Ireka awu osi ruruYour Noise is too much
MaveI am coming
Je zimiWait for me
VaveCome back
Eiyi Awu AturamiI am missing you
Navomi heLeave me alone

Also Read: List Of Clans In Ebiraland And The Towns & Villages They Dominate (Iresu Et’ebira) – Part 1.

I will be updating this Ebira Phrases article regularly please always comeback for more thanks

Drop your comments below and share with friends thank you.

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Basic Greetings in Ebira Language

Below are the basic greetings in Ebira language and the direct translation in English language.

Greetings in Ebira Language
Greetings in Ebira Language

Basic Greetings In Ebira Language

Ebira LanguageEnglish Language
NgwaoHello
TaoHi
NyẹnẹGood Morning
AkọrọWelldone
AhẹSorry
ẹtẹmẹya?How are you?
Anyar’ ọọduGood Afternoon
Anyar’oruvaGood Evening
AduhwọGood Night
AdijọBye Bye

Do you have Ebira lnaguage you dont know that you want me to translate for you? drop it at the comment section below. and i will get back to you shortly. thanks for reading please drop your comments below and share with friends.

Avọ Nini

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Ebira Culture – Things Women Must Not Do in Ebiraland (Taboos in Ebiraland)

Ebira Fashion Beads Isuu
Photo Credits to: Ebira Beauty pageant.

Taboos In Ebiraland – Before i start mentioning things Ebira Women are not allowed to do in Ebiraland (Culturally) i will like to give the definition of Culture before some people get it twisted.

So What is Culture?

According to the Oxford University Dictionary, Culture is the ideas, customs, and social behaviour of a particular people or society.

Just the same way other tribes have their Cultures and traditions Ebira People are not left out, and in every Culture there must be do and don’t, as in set 9f rules they are all following.
In Ebiraland there are some certain things that the Culture frowned at, things women are restricted from doing…

List of Things Women Must Not Do in Ebiraland – Taboos In Ebiraland.

  1. Women are restricted from Seeing Masquerades (Eku) – There is an exception for Onokus.
  2. Pregnant women must not take money from their husband pocket – Its believed the child after birth must steal.
  3. Pregnant Woman must not have sex with another man – The man that sleeps with pregnant woman that is not his wife, will forever live in poverty.
  4. No woman must have sex during her menstrual period.
  5. Any female child that fell from her Mum back will encounter husband’s death 7 times before it stopped.
  6. No pregnant woman should walk during the mid day or midnight to avoid given birth to Enebe or Ozi Emasu. (Destined to die prematurely child)

We have lots of taboo women must not attempt but i will stop at this juncture.

Also Read: The Ebira Concept Of Ozi-Emasu And Enebe.

Who are Onokus in Ebiraland?

Onoku in Ebiraland is a topic for another day, but i will just scratch the surface for us to know something about it.
Onokus are special type of women in Ebiraland (Please don’t get me wrong all women are wonderful and unique in various ways) initiated in some sort of cult which gives them more hands and say in Ebira Traditions than ordinary women. Onokus are born with the gift, women that are not Onokus from birth can’t be initiated.
Please just keep on visiting this blog till i publish the article on Onoku but before then please enjoy yourself with our numerous articles.

Drop your views and opinions in the comment section below and share with others, thanks for reading.

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Ebira People’s Cultural Concept of Naming Ceremony

During the dawn of time, back in the days when Islam and Christianity was not paramount in Ebiraland, Ebira people have their own traditional unique ways of naming Children.

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Full Details of Agidibo Ebira Musical Instrument (About, Uses & Origin).

The Agidibo which the english name is Slit Drum, is an idiophone drum, made from a hollowed piece of wood in which a narrow groove serves as a sound opening. The Agidibo is struck with a stick along both sides of the narrow groove, which produces two different pitches. The possibility of combining rhythm with pitch enables the Agidibo to act as a means of communication for Ebira People during festivals like New Yam Featival or during the initiation of New Otaarus.

The three most common types are the cylindrical, the trapezoid and the zoomorphic. Besides these we also find them in the form of a tulip, half-moon and boat.

Agidibo Ebira Drum edited

The basic structure of the drum is virtually the same for each type and is best illustrated by the cylindrical Agidibo. A block of wood, usually part of a tree trunk, is cut into the desired shape and then hollowed out through the slit in the upper side. The drum-maker/woodcutter ensures that the two sides of the drum are unequal in thickness so that different pitches are produced when played with two drum sticks. The two-tone structure will later form the basis for the transmission of a message, the purpose for which these instruments are best known.

Origin Of Agidibo in Ebiraland.

Before we talk about the uses of it, there is a need to know how our ancestors come about the instrument, according to research the first person to use the Agidibo in Ebiraland is Adayi Etazi (Adayi Ebira), he was the first person to play the Agidibo.

The Uses of Agidibo.

These days Agidibo is widely used, almost in every events in the land ranging from Unehe to Modern yearly Ebira Carnival. But back in the early ages it has specific uses, the use is limited to some certain set of people (The Ohi’s, Herbalists and Otaaru’s).

The main function of Agidibo is to dispense messages to the people, even though Agidibo is a musical instrument it’s a sacred one (according to research).

Also used for announcing the death of great people like Kings, Herbalists, Great Hunters and Important people in the society.
And its messages are often in parables that only the wise can understand.

It’s also used for announcing certain festivals like New Yam Feativals and Eche Ori festival, whenever Agidibo is been beaten, those that understand the sounds knows exactly the messages been passed.

Agidibo has thesame function with the African talking drum (Ugogoyin), the little different is that you can dance to Ugogoyin but reverse is the case for Agidibo.

A very good example of the uses is during Ekuechi festival, Eku Ahete follows the sound of Agidibo before living the IREBA (The Masquerades Resident).

Thanks for reading please do drop your opinions in the comment section and share with your friends.

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